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Carmelo Anthony ranked below Lonzo Ball in NBA rankings, Players and Fans react



Story highlights:


  • Carmelo Anthony fell from the NBA top 50 ranking
  • Lonzo Ball a rookie, gets ranked before Carmelo prior to playing his first NBA game
  • Players and Fans react negatively to this


ESPN has just recently concluded its annual NBA ranking, and many are curious as to why this years player rankings is one of the most criticized in recent history. To start, the largest story coming out of this ranking is the demotion of Carmelo Anthony. Anthony, who has been a top 50 player all of his career has been marked at #63 in the league this year after putting up similar statistics to his last 5 seasons. Carmelo is a 10 time NBA all star and a 3 time Olympic gold medalist making him one of the most decorated players to ever step on the court. His fall from the top 50 hints that his career is on the decline when in reality he can still compete on the highest level and has averaged over 20 points per game in every season of his career. While the number alone offended Carmelo, being placed behind a rookie who hasn’t played a single game hurt him more. The rookie I am referring to is Lonzo Ball, a LA Laker who previously led his college team UCLA to the best season they’ve had in years. Over the span of his college season, Lonzo ball began growing in popularity to the point where he and his father Lavar ball were essentially household names. Coming into the league, he is easily the most famous of his freshman class and took the summer league MVP. While his accomplishments are impressive, he has still yet to play a full NBA game thus ranking him over Carmelo Anthony, a veteran of over 10 years is deemed by many as extremely disrespectful. After thousands of tweets from angry fans, confused commentators, and astounded analysts, Carmelo Anthony broke his silence on the topic and addressed it all in a tweet. He stated that he, like many basketball fans thought the list was disrespectful and he was having a hard time making sense of it. Along with Carmelo, CJ McCollum took to twitter stating, “We need to start ranking these weak ass journalists.”  This really displayed the attention professional athletes pay to external criticism and how often they feel a disconnect with media. This has been shown time and time again in the world of sports whether its LeBron and Stephen A Smith getting into debate over false information or its Marshawn lynch completely disregarding journalists questions for an entire interview. Because they are frequently under the microscope many of them feel the need to defend their image or name from what is being spread through out the media. Professional athletes have feelings like everyone else and with players like Kevin Durant in the league it is becoming more and more likely to see players responding to negative articles and press. When Kevin Durant moved to Golden State people cursed him calling him a slew of names from traitor, to bandwagon, to snake, and many more less appropriate ones. Kevin Durant responded to all of this criticism and hate with a pair of shoes that have all of his accomplishments written over what the naysayers said on the sides. All in all, athletes see articles the same way we do and seeing them react like humans should not be a surprise to people.

Study finds that being a female can contribute to consuming a healthier diet

Story Highlights:

  • Fruits and vegetables are major contributors to a balanced and healthy diet
  • Factors including gender, age, socio-economic status, and home availability have been found to effect fruit and vegetable consumption
  • Girls and young children are more likely to eat a healthy, balanced diet

Fruits and vegetables are packed with vitamins and nutrients that are essential to both adults and children in order to maintain a healthy diet. Studies often show that the patterns and habits adopted by children in regard to eating healthy set the tone for how healthy their diets will be in the future. One study directed by the University of Copenhagen, the University of Oslo, the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, and Erasmus University Medical Center suggest that certain demographics contribute to these patterns of eating. 

After analyzing 465 papers from 21 different countries, and including 98 papers in their final results, the authors of this study concluded that the two major contributing demographics are age and gender/sex. Research from 49 papers included information on the connection between gender and the consumption of fruits and vegetables, and the overwhelming majority came to the conclusion that females consume these foods at higher frequencies. Research on age was included by 22 of the papers, and the general trend found in many was that consumption of fruits and vegetables decreased with age. 

From this research, it can be concluded that young girls have the highest tendency to eat healthy, balanced diets, specifically in reference to the consumption of fruits and vegetables.

Young Adults' Spontaneous Posts on Social Media Have Future Consequences with Employers

Story Highlights:

  • Adolescents are posting risky and inappropriate content such as alcohol, drugs, and nudity on social media. 
  • Those who spend more time on social media post riskier content. 
  • Adolescents from different countries post an equal amount of risky content, but the type of content varies. 
One post on social media can ruin your whole life. Young adults are both aware and unaware of the content that they post on social media. They have been made aware that future job companies and universities look at online profiles prior to acceptance and judge whether or not they are appropriate enough. However, some users are unaware that even the normal posts, which are perceived to be posted by everyone, are risky. Not all posts are appropriate and the risky posts contain images such as alcohol, drugs, and nudity. Adolescents across the world are equally posting risky content so, the damage being done isn't from a specific area or country. However, the type of risky post does vary between countries. 

Users are labeled as "self-monitors", which equates to how much energy is spent on one's own account. The individuals who are higher in self monitoring are more predictable and more likely to post riskier posts. They try to follow the trends and post what they believe others want to see. Those who are less involved in self monitoring post more about their true self and what they want to see. Both types of users are spontaneous and have risky posts, but they vary.

A study surveyed 178 British and Italian undergraduate students that were both genders and the average age was 21. The survey had a scoring system where the students would rank posts from: "1- No, I don't post like this" to "5- Yes, I always post like this". It also contained a true and false section that added to the points. The survey asked questions about types of posts containing drinking, drugs, and offensive language, and on what social networking sites these posts were being made. The goal of the study was to see how posts from young adults differed from different countries.

The results of the study were that countries posted different types of risk and type of post platform, but overall it was similar because they had about an equal amount of risky posts. The survey concluded that the more time a young adult spent online the riskier their posts were. The students who posted a lot thought that it was common to post risky things and that it was "cool." It was determined that posts were both spontaneous and intentional for all types of self monitors. So, making a snap decision to post something is a popular trend, but not always the positive trend.

Studies suggest nomophobia can be traced through usage and dependability of smartphones.

Story Highlights:

  • Nomophobia is increasing as smartphone usage continues to rise.
  • Nomophobia is caused by a heavy dependability and attachment to smartphones
  • Study mainly consisted of participants in their 20's, shows how a younger audience may be more likely to show symptoms of nomophobia.

Smartphones are everywhere. They are in the hands of students, adults and even young children. With constant usage comes dependability.  Nomophobia, as defined by Scientific American, is "the 
feelings of anxiety or distress that some people experience when not having their phone" (Valdesolo). A recent study was put together to 
see how usage and attachment to ones smartphone may lead to nomophobia, as described 
beforehand. The study showed signs of nomophobia due to a survey response of the participants, many who showed signs of heavy dependability and attachment to their smartphone. With this study present, it is plausible 
to assume that cases of nomophobia will become more common.

The study was conducted through an online survey with varying questions. These questions where the determinants in order to determine whether the participants showed signs of nomophobia, through their responses to questions about their smartphones and the attachment to them. There were 301 participants, all the participants were in college in South Korea and were between the ages of 18 to 39. More information about the participants habits, cell phone usage, and attachment levels were used to determine levels of nomophobia. The questions asked are located in the appendix of the study

After analyzing the data collected, the study showed how levels of cell phone usage and cell phone attachment can be used to detect nomophobia. This was done by looking at the participants responses to the questionnaire, which where answered by using a 1 through 7 point system, with 1 being "Strongly Disagree" and 7 being "Strongly Agree". The study discussed how some may become attached to their devices through memory, and by seeing a smartphone as an extention of themselves. By analyzing the data, the study shows how increase usage and attachment levels can increase the sensation of nomophobia, and how in the future, more cases of nomophobia will be common with the advancement of technology and increase smartphone use and dependability.

Study Reveals That Different Nationalities Are Not Exempt From Inappropriate Social Media Use And Suggests Increased Filtering When Adolescents Are Considering Posting

Story Highlights:
  • The driving forces behind the post of many adolescents are impulsiveness and self-monitoring
  • Social media is a resource available to almost everyone
  • Social media users should consider the long-term effects of a possible post before it is uploaded.

Social media is a resource that is accessible to everyone. Thus, when one makes an instantaneous post believing that only friends will view it, the truth is that everyone in the world also has the same opportunity - all you need is an internet connection. The infiniteness of the internet should never be taken for granted. For instance, future employers can easily gain access and take a glimpse into your personal life if you so provide it. This being the truth of the matter, considering one's filter should have a far greater meaning than simply editing a photo. Unfortunately, many adolescents overlook this reality when creating their social profiles and pages. 

To investigate this inclination of adolescents, a team of scientists - Claire M. White, MSc, Clara A. Cutello, MSc, Michaela Gummerum, PhD - orchestrated a study involving 178 undergraduate students from Britain (88) and Italy (90). Participants were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding their social media usage - inquiries ranged from usage time to the quality and content of their posts. The data provided from the study revealed that individuals from Britain were more likely to post about their drug or alcohol use, while those from Italy often posted personal and offensive information. Despite, the variation in content, the study supports the notion that an overwhelming majority of individuals, regardless of nationality, are not exempt from unbefitting media use. Moreover, a common driving force stands behind many of the inappropriate posts from young adults: impulsiveness and self-monitoring. In the form of likes, retweets, and thumbs-up, social media users have developed a sense of acceptance when making uploads of themselves conducting an inappropriate activity. Effectively, social media platforms have enabled private activities and information to become colloquial, shared, and public matter.

From Facebook and Twitter to Instagram and Snapchat, young adults flood the internet with millions of tweets, posts, and uploads every day. All too frequently, users offer the public web a greater glimpse into their personal lives than is considered appropriate. When utilizing social media, individuals must always keep in mind that cyber cultures are indistinguishable because anyone from anywhere can become a part of it.

Technology in the classroom can improve student performances


  • Technology is changing the traditional classroom
  • Study finds student prefer integrating technology into the classroom 
  • Results suggest there is more than one path for optimal exam performance 



The technology has changed big time over the years starting from the chalk boards and now the have computers to do everything. For example when I was in elementary school I did not have any technology in my classes, we used straight pen and paper. Now they use a lot more technology in all classrooms even in the elementary schools now. The problem teachers are having is being able to integrate the new technology in the schools and in the classrooms. Researchers recently looked at the extent to which students access and use technology resources and whether using technology to prepare is superior to traditional learning methods and exam performances.  This study examines students use of technology for learning retaliative to more traditional learning methods and the effect on exam performances in class. 79 undergraduate students participated in the study and were require to complete a online survey. Throughout the semester the professor kept a record of attendance and exams score average. Overall they found that the majority of the students are integrating technology into their course preparation and routine. Students are relying more on technology than reading chapters in a book before class. This information can be used for teachers to help them integrate more technology in the classroom to optimism student learning and performance.

Positive Effects of Yoga Found in Study of Nursing Students


  • Nursing students can benefit from participating in yoga courses during their studies
  • Study looks at impact of yoga mindfulness, self compassion, empathy, resilience, and satisfaction with life. 
  • Participants in the yoga group showed significant improvement in self compassion and mindfulness 
Most people in college experience high levels of stress that can impact their psychological functioning. Nursing students may be under more stress and anxiety than other students. It's important that they find ways to manage the stress in a healthy way that doesn't impact their studies. Yoga has been referenced as a useful way to relieve stress and maintain physical and emotional well being. 
Recently a study was done that looked at the differences between the psychological functioning between nursing students who took a yoga class for 8 weeks and those who didn't. 100 female nursing students between the ages 17 and 30 were included in the study. They were recruited from nursing school in India and were split into two groups. Half of them took a yoga class 5 days a week for one hour a day for 8 weeks, the other group continued with their normal schedules without a yoga class. Data were collected using sociodemographic sheets and five self-reported questionnaires. They measured mindfulness, resilience, self-compassion, life satisfaction, empathy, and perception of stress.

Overall, their data revealed that the eight week yoga intervention was significantly effective in improving self compassion and mindfulness for the nursing students in this study. There were improvements among yoga participants for resilience and perceived stress levels. This study can be used to help advocate for physical activity outlets, such as yoga, for students -specifically nursing students - that can be used to decrease stress levels. It would be interesting to see the impact of a meditation or yoga type class being required in high stress education programs such as nursing or medical school.


The more time you spend online, may increase your feeling of loneliness.


Story Highlights :

  • There is a significant correlation between internet usage and loneliness
  • Relationships online are mostly platonic and face to face interactions prove to be higher compared to online relationships.
  • People who lack a clearly defined self typically spend more time online.

The internet is a medium that is not only beneficial for society but can also negatively impact Increased usage of this piece of technology has seen a rise in the duration of time spent online. Kraut, the psychologist leading a particular study wanted to explore the effects of the internet on the psyche and social impact on the users who frequent it. These individuals are classified under PIU, pathological internet use. Those with PIU were shown to be more vulnerable and were categorized to visit more adult sites, emotional help, and spend more time with like-minded individuals.

Many users are anonymous on the web and are more confident and free to be expressive both in position and negative ways. The internet is a medium that is beneficial for this. In light of this information, a hypothesis was tested that individuals would actually be less lonely. However, they would show a dependency and show PIU symptoms instead. For those in poor conditions and rural locations, the internet may serve as an outlet to escape and connect to virtual communities; which would show a negative correlation between the size of community and loneliness.

The study that was conducted was a group of 203 people. with the majority of the participants being female. and Caucasian. Participants were asked to come to a room to complete several questionnaires. Through the process of several questionnaires and scales, the study measured motives: communication, entertainment, and informational. The models that were used to access the web.
Results showed an overall correlation of negative effects between PIU symptoms and time spent online. The users who had gone online for communication correlated with loneliness, while entertainment and information were correlated with time online.

Study Links Cultural Differences with Risky Social Media Activity in U.K. and Italy


STORY HIGHLIGHTS:

  • British culture scores high in Indulgence Factor, Italian culture high in Masculinity
  • Italians more likely to participate in risky social media activity out of defiance rather than personal enjoyment
  • British more likely to post sensitive personal information online, Italians more likely to post about alcohol and drug use
A new study conducted by researchers from the University of Plymouth has found a link between cultural differences and risky social media activity. After evaluating 178 Italian and British undergraduate students, the researchers concluded that the British, who had drastically different cultural scores than the Italians, were more likely to engage in risky social media activity for the sake of self-enjoyment. British students were found to share personal information online more openly than their Italian counterparts. On the other hand, the Italian students were most likely to post alcohol or drug use onto their social networking accounts, mostly for the reason of defying a more uptight society. Both groups, however, were found to have a relatively similar statistic for posting sexual content.

Students were evaluated based on a variety of tests such as frequency of use, self-presentation, online risk exposure, and the values survey module. In the values survey module, students were scored on six content areas: Power Distance, Individualism versus Collectivism, Masculinity versus Femininity, Uncertainty Avoidance, Long versus Short Term Orientation, and Indulgence versus Restraint. It was found that British students scored high in the categories of Power distance, Long-term orientation, and significantly high in Indulgence, whereas Italian students scored high in Uncertainty Avoidance and significantly high in Masculinity. Both groups scored about the same in the Individualism category.

In recent years, the use of social media has skyrocketed, especially with the development of applications that make it easy for people to share, blog, like, or post about themselves or what they’re interested in. Friends, family, employers, admissions officers all look to social networking sites such as Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter in order to check up on people. Despite the publicity of many of these profiles, much of what people put onto social media can be labelled as “risky,” in that the content contains sensitive personal information, alcohol or drug use, sexual content, or even offensive material.





Television Viewership Data Could Have Predicted the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election

Story Highlights:

  • Poll-driven predictions are no longer powerful enough to call the outcomes of recent political events
  • New big-data driven models are proving to be incredibly accurate, looking at non-traditional datasets like television viewership
  • Predictive models are useful for politicians to understand their strengths and weaknesses spatially

Traditional poll-driven prediction models are not cutting it anymore. After failing to report and predict the outcomes of the 2016 U.S. election and Brexit, many concerned citizens and politicians are losing faith in these traditional methods.  Thus, big data-driven models are becoming increasingly valuable in helping politicians understand their strengths and weaknesses while campaigning. This study published in the journal Big Data, compares how critical information derived from television viewership data of partisan and nonpartisan shows could have helped called the outcomes of swing states and more accurately predict the 2016 election. According to the Big Data study, just by looking at 2012 viewership data of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - a modeled trained on that data could have correctly called 8 out of 10 swing states in the 2012 election. This snapshot gives a glimpse of the predictive potential of taking into account non-traditional data variables like television viewership. Scaling this model to include thousands of other shows, rather than just one, would result in a very valuable variable - one that would not typically be accounted for in traditional poll-driven prediction models. Lacking non-traditional variables like this could result in a vastly different outcome.

We must look to new ways of monitoring these major political events. Newer big data-driven models are the key to accurately predicting today's political events. Although voter behavior and trends are becoming increasingly complex with the varieties of news outlets, we now have an unprecedented amount of data we can look at to better understand and predict voter decisions. It is up to data scientists to reliably analyze this data and honestly report it to the public.

Predictive tools like data-trained models are incredibly useful. When broken down geographically to individual states and counties, politicians can aim to strengthen their support base and campaign where need be. Big data holds the answers to the future.

Free Sites that Could Be Costing You Thousands

Story Highlights:

  • Undergrads are posting things such as alcohol, private information, and even nudity.
  • Research shows that people from the UK and Ireland show similarities between their posts.
  • Pressure to fit in usually affect the riskiness of the post.

While most social networking sites offer free subscriptions to its members, the long term effects could be ruining your entire financial future. A group more susceptible to these damaging sites is students, particularly college age. The temptation to post one’s every move is infecting undergrads across the globe. In today’s culture, a reputation is more important than a resume. Regardless of ones credentials, employers are still searching through their applicants’ social networking handles to ensure they are hiring a good all-around candidate. 

The real question is why? What is the reasoning for such an impulsive post? The University of Plymouth has the answers. They studied undergrads in the UK and Italy to monitor their postings on social media and what caused them. While it was shown that as a whole, the young people posted generally similar things, there were some difference. The study proved that British impulsivity was greater than that of the Italians. On the other hand, Italian’s had a greater sense of self-monitoring, meaning that they cared more about their image. British undergrads were more likely to post about alcohol and drug use, while the Italians focused more on exposing their own personal information and offensive posts. 

Controls within the study were self-presentation measure and time spent online. This enabled the researchers to form a scale to relate risky posts with qualities of the people doing the posting. The study does acknowledge its own limitations in that it only examined the undergraduate students in Great Britain and Italy and does not account for the population in the rest of the world. However, this study can be applied mostly anywhere. It concluded that while many youths post impulsively, they are often fully aware of what they are doing. This does not mean that they do not come to regret their decisions when they go in for their first interview. Young adults aren’t as focused on being employable in the future as they are about maintaining their “cool kid” reputation. It can only make you wonder: Is the photo of the glass of beer shared with friends really worth a life-long career?


White, C. M., Cutello, C. A., Gummerum, M., & Hanoch, Y. (2017). A Cross-Cultural Study of Risky Online Self-Presentation. Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking.

Melo ranked below Lonzo Ball, Players and Fans react


ESPN has just recently concluded its annual NBA ranking, and many are curious as to why this years player rankings is one of the most criticized in recent history. To start, the largest story coming out of this ranking is the demotion of Carmelo Anthony. Anthony, who has been a top 50 player all of his career has been marked at #63 in the league this year after putting up similar statistics to his last 5 seasons. Carmelo is a 10 time NBA all star and a 3 time Olympic gold medalist making him one of the most decorated players to ever step on the court. His fall from the top 50 hints that his career is on the decline when in reality he can still compete on the highest level and has averaged over 20 points per game in every season of his career. While the number alone offended Carmelo, being placed behind a rookie who hasn’t played a single game hurt him more. The rookie I am referring to is Lonzo Ball, a LA Laker who previously led his college team UCLA to the best season they’ve had in years. Over the span of his college season, Lonzo ball began growing in popularity to the point where he and his father Lavar ball were essentially household names. Coming into the league, he is easily the most famous of his freshman class and took the summer league MVP. While his accomplishments are impressive, he has still yet to play a full NBA game thus ranking him over Carmelo Anthony, a veteran of over 10 years is deemed by many as extremely disrespectful. After thousands of tweets from angry fans, confused commentators, and astounded analysts, Carmelo Anthony broke his silence on the topic and addressed it all in a tweet. He stated that he, like many basketball fans thought the list was disrespectful and he was having a hard time making sense of it. Along with Carmelo, CJ McCollum took to twitter stating, “We need to start ranking these weak ass journalists.”  This really displayed the attention professional athletes pay to external criticism and how often they feel a disconnect with media. This has been shown time and time again in the world of sports whether its LeBron and Stephen A Smith getting into debate over false information or its Marshawn lynch completely disregarding journalists questions for an entire interview. Because they are frequently under the microscope many of them feel the need to defend their image or name from what is being spread through out the media. Professional athletes have feelings like everyone else and with players like Kevin Durant in the league it is becoming more and more likely to see players responding to negative articles and press. When Kevin Durant moved to Golden State people cursed him calling him a slew of names from traitor, to bandwagon, to snake, and many more less appropriate ones. Kevin Durant responded to all of this criticism and hate with a pair of shoes that have all of his accomplishments written over what the naysayers said on the sides. All in all, athletes see articles the same way we do and seeing them react like humans should not be a surprise to people.

We are increasing our children's chance of contracting HIV by not talking to them about sex

Story Highlights

  • Sexual education in Africa positively impacts how people think about sex, feel about sex, and understand sex as a whole.
  • There are many barriers in parent-child communication about sex including socioeconomic status, age, education, or religion, thus creating a lecture conversation, rather than a two-way conversation.
  • There is a common belief that talking about contraception can lead to an increase in sexual activity, therefore increasing HIV rates, which is entirely inaccurate.

According to a recent study, there is a lack of communication between the parent and child in sub-Saharan Africa when it comes to talking about sex, and the reason for this is because of the many barriers that are present that negatively affect this communication. Depending on the parent's sex, age, religious affiliation, socioeconomic status, residence, and school education, children may be getting a very limited perception about sex. Someone who has low-income, didn't finish school, and is very religious will most likely talk solely about abstinence when it comes to talking about sex with their children for fear that any other conversation will encourage sex. However, studies have shown that talking about sex actually positively impacts how the children understand sex, and will therefore be more knowledgeable about safe sex. 
Photo from The Huffington Post
The actual study looked at 23 articles online in which data was collected about sexual communication between parents and their children, behavioral outcomes as a result to the sexual communication, and what can improve communication between a parent and their child. 

One viewpoint that is made clear by this article is that when there is communication between a parent and child about sex in sub-Saharan Africa, it is not an actual conversation. Studies have shown that parents who are talking to their child about sex aren't having a two-way conversation; instead, the parent is doing most of the talking while the teen is just listening. This does not allow for the teens to ask questions and contribute to the conversation, thus limiting their understanding about sex.

By limiting teenager's knowledge about contraceptives and safe sex, they are more likely to contract a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or get pregnant at an early age. If their parents only preached abstinence but decide to be rebellious and have sex anyway, they don't know about condoms or birth control, thus increasing their likelihood of getting pregnant or getting a disease. The study shows that parents must overcome these barriers that causes a lack of communication about sex and have that difficult and uncomfortable conversation if they want their child to be safe. 

Study finds benefits of physical activity courses in college

  • New study finds physical activity courses help reduce stress for college students 
  • Researchers compared stress levels of over 1000 college students from two universities
  • Students get satisfaction from physical activity courses   
In a newly released study, researchers looked to find the impact physical activity courses had on student stress, and if the fact that the course was required for graduation impact its effect. They examined students from a university that offered but did not require physical activity classes for graduation and students from a university that offered and required physical activity classes for graduation. They looked at a total of 1243 college students from two universities and all participants were enrolled in a physical activity class.
The researchers developed a survey to measure the affects of physical activity on stress. The survey had eight open ended questions, two likert-type scale questions and one question asking about the number of activity classes taken. There were five categories of activity classes recorded: team (basketball, flag football, soccer, etc.), outdoor (archery, rock climbing, mountain biking), fitness (cycling, yoga, dance, etc.), individual (golf, tennis, bowling, etc.), and water (scuba and swim). Three questions were asked about stress perceptions, five yes or no questions were asked about how students felt about the activity course, and participants were also asked to rate their stress level when arriving to class on a scale of 1-4  and were asked the same about their stress levels leaving the class.
They found from students at both universities that participated in physical activity classes helped students forget their stressors, increased confidence in handling stress and that they left they class activity not feeling as stressed as when they arrived. Overall, this study shows how helpful physical activity can be in the lives of college students who are usually under a lot of stress. The results also showed that students were very satisfied with their physical activity courses, noting that the courses relieved stress and provided an oulet for students to be physically active.
Interestingly, the researchers noted previous studies that found many four year colleges and universities have eliminated or are eliminating physical activity courses for graduation. Requring students to take these courses could have a positive impact on their overall college experience by providing a healthy and safe outlet to relieve stress. Having healthy outlets and ways to manage stress can help college students make better decisions and have a better college experience overall.

Study Shows that Products Marketed Specifically as "Crowdsourced" Increased its Market Performance by 20%

Story Highlights:
•"crowdsourced" products appeal more to consumers
•Consumer-ideated goods and services build trust among those who might buy
•This has real market value, and companies are flocking
 People are tired of seeing crazy television ads making wild claims about the capabilities of their new products. Most people know that almost all of these products are based more on marketing than actual quality of design or true capabilities. However, as crowdsourcing continues to grow as a means for new products to get a footing in the world-wide marketplace, many brand new as well as older companies are looking for alternatives. One new study found that labeling a product as being crowdsourced could go as far as increasing market performance by up to 20%.

The study was based off of two different experiments that found that merely just marketing a product as being crowdsourced could change consumers' opinions of it. When people are under the impression that a product is crowdsourced, people assume that it is "customer-ideated" and therefore is designed with the purpose of focusing on the needs of consumers who have reached out about certain issues they had. "Crowds" of consumers might do a better job of suggesting new ideas for products, as there is often a much larger potential for creativity among the potentially much larger group of consumers than producers in a certain market of products. "Crowdsourcing" platforms are also used to gauge potential interest of new products before they emerge onto the real world marketplace.

The product did not even need to actually be crowdsourced as long as it was marketed as such, according to the study. This numerically quantifiable increase in performance will make a big difference in the marketing world in the next few years. This trend will likely grow and continue to grab mainstream attention until it possibly becomes one of the forefront ways for companies big or small to introduce new products, and increase their sales in the real world.

Television Viewership Data Could Predict Future Election Outcomes


Traditional poll-driven prediction models are not cutting it anymore. After failing to report and predict the outcomes of the 2016 U.S. election and Brexit, many concerned citizens and politicians are losing faith in these traditional methods. We must look to new ways of monitoring these major political events. Thus. predictive models are becoming increasingly valuable in helping politicians understand their strengths and weaknesses while campaigning. This study published in the journal Big Data, compares how critical information derived from television viewership data of partisan and nonpartisan shows could have helped called the outcomes of swing states and more accurately predict the 2016 election. Lacking non-traditional variables like this could result in a vastly different outcome.

Newer big data-driven models are the key to accurately predicting today's political events. Although voter behavior and trends are becoming increasingly complex with the varieties of news outlets, we now have an unprecedented amount of data we can look at to better understand and predict voter decisions. According to the Big Data study, just by looking at 2012 viewership data of The Daily Show with Jon Stewart - a modeled trained on that data could have correctly called 8 out of 10 swing states in the 2012 election. This snapshot gives a glimpse of the predictive potential of taking into account non-traditional data variables like television viewership. Scaling this model to include thousands of other shows, rather than just one, would result in a very valuable variable - one that would not typically be accounted for in traditional poll-driven prediction models.

Predictive tools like data-trained models are incredibly useful. When broken down geographically to individual states and counties, politicians can aim to strengthen their support base and campaign where need be. Big data holds the answers to the future. It is up to data scientists to reliably analyze this data and honestly report it to the public.

Study reveals how naiveness in risky social media posts is not true

Story Highlights:
-Study was conducted by researchers to see if social media users who post risky online content was not just impulsive decisions
-They used participants from different countries and found that even though there were different in what they thought as risky content, people from both countries kn ew what they were doing when posting
-Participants also know of the possible ramifications like jail or unemployment and still post risky content showing that they weren't naive
Results showed that naiveness can not always be the case as most people who were in the study
In a recent study, conducted by researchers Claire White, Clara Cutello, Michaela Gummerman, and Yaniv Hanoch, observations were shown that social media users who post risky online content that could get the in trouble with either the law or future employers was not just impulsive decisions thinking ahead, but a lot of the users knew what they were getting themselves into.
The study assigned a questionnaire to 178 people, some who were British and some who were Italian, with a roughly even divide between boys and girls to get a good variety of people.
There was some difference between cultures as the people from Britain were more likely to show their drug and alcohol use, while the Italians showed more personal information. Two very bad things to posting out to the world, but both have the same effect. However, Among both inhabitants from the country, the study revealed they had the same  process when posting risky online content. No matter what culture they were from or what situation the participants grew up in, they are all human and have the same thought process when going through a post or a decision for that matter.
What this means is, even though young adults in this day in age can try and play off a bad social media footprint as being "young and wild" or "naive", employers can still say that users know exactly what they are doing when posting and it can indeed be a reflection of the user. Good or bad.
Overall, the study has proven that Naiveness isn't always and excuse. There has been many efforts to try and want kids about the dangers of social media, but it seems that some of them might make the decision knowing what parts it could lead to.
Social Media has been a growing epidemic in recent years. From Facebook to Twitter to Snapchat, the internet landscape has been forever changed by the use of social media. But, the one click of the button could actually come back to haunt you, as what you think is private might not be the case to others.

Bloodshed in Central African Republic Leaves Dozens of Civilians Dead

Story Highlights:

  • Clashes between rebel groups in the CAR have resulted in dozens of civilian casualties.
  • The murders are called "reprisal killings." Murders of this type occur when one group seeks revenge for the killing of their members by another group.
  • There has yet to be an adequate response to deal with this crisis, whether in the form of humanitarian aid from the UN or government action from the CAR.


Dozens of innocent civilians have died and tens of thousands have fled their homes in the Central African Republic in the past few months after an increase in militant violence among several rebel groups. The conflict, which stems from a long-lasting rivalry between two splinter cells of the Muslim militant group formerly known as Seleka, the UPC(Union for Peace) and the FPRC(Front for Renaissance), has recently spilled into villages in the Ouaka province of the CAR, an area that has an unfortunate history of violence. This new round of tragedies has caused many civilians in the region to fear for their safety.

According to an investigation conducted by the Human Rights Watch, the rebel groups have taken victims of all ages. One man, under the name "Clement," reported the death of his four children, aged seven months to thirteen years, saying, "We found them there, dead on the mat. They had all been shot" (Human Rights Watch). The report categorized these murders and others like them as "reprisal killings," in which one group kills a civilian, causing a more violent response from the other group. In only a few days, this chain of reprisal killings can result in dozens of senseless casualties. 

Even as this violence has taken a severe toll on the people of the CAR, there has yet to be a sufficient local or global response to combat it. Currently, a Special Criminal Court has been appointed to investigate the conflict, yet justice is a slow process. Humanitarian aid to the region has been lacking, as less than 8% of the UN's goal has been contributed by member nations. Whatever the means to alleviate the suffering, something must be done soon to prevent the loss of more innocent lives.

Study Shows the Different types of explicit content shared on social media networking sites between Italian and British youth and explores its potential to hurt a reputation while suggesting that the youth practice filtered posting

Story Highlights:
  • The rise of SNS's allows us to increase our social standing along with employment and networking opportunities; this study was conducted to specifically find how Italian and British youths used their platforms to express themselves
  • Results showed that British youth posted more explicit material about drug and alcohol use whereas Italian youth posted more offensive and intimate content about their personal lives
  • Shows that proper self-representation on Social Media Networking Sites is very important and that SNS's can be risky when abused 

The School of Psychology at the University of Plymouth, located in the United Kingdom conducted studies to deduce the nature of "Online Self-Presentation", specifically between two separate cultures, in this case between British and Italian youths. The results of this study found that there were differences among the content being posted between both the British and Italian youth. While the British youth resorted to their social media to post pictures and comments related to their use of drugs and alcohol, the Italian youth posted more offensive content and revealed more personal information about their lives. 

The purpose of this study was to investigate the way young adults present themselves on social media in order to help explain the differences in self-presentation. These youths are given a unique platform to increase their social standing, social capital, and even employment opportunities. Social Capital is defined as the networks of relationships among people who live and work together within a particular society, enabling that society to function effectively. Often times, however, youths do not necessarily use these platforms in appropriate ways, and this is what was tested in the study with levels that specifically addressed alcohol/drug content, sexual content, personal content, or offensive content.

The primary data collection unit specified for this study was through an online questionnaire, which was administered by professors in return for class work credit for undergraduate students. There were 178 British participants, of which 73 were female and 178 Italian participants of which 57 were female. The rise of Social Networking Sites (SNS), as well as increased access to media platforms through various technological developments, has led to a sharp increase in the number of youths who engage in Social Media.  That being said, the questionnaire asked the students the top ten Social Networking Sites they used, how much time they spent on the sites. Alongside these questions, they performed various tests to assess the degree of the aforementioned levels.

The results of the study go to show that there is most certainly a risk related to open self-expression on social media networking sites. There is, in fact, a limit to what one should post and certain guidelines that we should abide by when it comes to social media.



Non-usage of Social Networking Sites by Teenagers, self-presentation and cyber safety concerns



Story Highlights:

* Many adolescents are not using social networking sites such as Myspace and facebook

* The issue of taking too much time to connect with someone, cyber safety concerns and dislike of self-presentation online are some reasons of non-usage of SNSs

* Operators such as Facebook would have to take some steps to maintain their popularity among teenagers


Online social networking sites(SNSs), such as My-space and Facebook, are web-based services that allow individuals to construct public or semi-public profiles, connect with other users, and view  their list of connections and those made by others within the system. Although there are currently no reliable data regarding how many people use SNSs, marketing research indicates that SNSs are growing exponentially among adolescents in popularity worldwide. However, a recent study that came out shows that many adolescents have reported the non-usage of social networking sites due to various factors such as,too time consuming, usage of alternative sites, cyber safety concerns and self-presentation issues.

The sample of the study were 64 out of 229 students aged 13-18 years from Australian Secondary School who reported the non-use of social networking sites and therefore were eligible for this test. The students were required to complete a questionnaire and in the end were asked to state the reasons why they don't use social networking sites. After the experiment was conducted, it was found out that 51% of students stated no interest or motivation to use SNSs, 42% claimed that it was too time-consuming and would rather do alternative activities than use Facebook, 41% claimed to use other forms of communication like simple phone call or texts, 23% reported concerns for their cyber safety and lastly 15% associated the use of SNSs with self-presentation issues.

Therefore, From this study we can conclude that, that due to the issue of taking too much time to connect with someone, cyber safety concerns and dislike of self-presentation online, social networking sites are not appealing to adolescents anymore. Thus, in order to keep the interest of the teenage audience, the site operators such as Facebook, Myspace etc. would have to take a different approach. 

  

Study Explains How Individual Differences Can Influence Self- Presentation On Social Media

Story Highlights:

  • Impulsiveness and self-monitoring can influence online self-presentation.
  • "Risky" postings can result in negative outcomes.
  • Cultural differences in understanding social media performance activity.

Recently, the use of social media among adolescents and young adults has been very popular as to how they communicate with each other and how they want to present themselves to each other. Lately, the content generated on social networking apps have not been appropriate or legal. According to a study published by the University of Plymouth, the study investigated individual differences in how impulsiveness and self- monitoring can influence online self-presentation. Postings on sites like Twitter or Instagram are usually spontaneous and could be linked to an impulsiveness for posting to keep followers engaged with the users daily lives.

Previous research highlighted the cultural differences in understanding, use of social media and the internet performance activity. The study showed that the British participants used more social media, but didn't spend as much time each week as the Italian participants did. Self-monitoring was significantly related to risky online posting, where posting offensive content was considered as risky posting. For the British participants, the significant relationships were found for alcohol/ drug content, sexual content, and personal content. For the Italian participants, there was a significant connection between self- monitoring, alcohol/ drug content, personal content and offensive content. 

Overall, social media is very popular over adolescents and young adults that want to keep a good online representation, yet not much is known why individuals continue to post potentially negative comments and images. What the results showed, was that young adults can behave impetuously and deliberately depending on the situation. The findings in the study supported the previous studies, proving that the risks posting on social media that is posted by young adults, can result in potentially negative outcomes.

Young adults underestimate the risk associated with posting personal or sensitive information on social networking sites.

Story Highlights:
  • Most behavior on social networking sites can either be explained by impulsiveness or a deliberate attempt to create a certain persona.
  • More impulsive users were found to be at higher risk for risky online posting in the form of offensive content and personal information than the participants themselves estimated.
  • More deliberate users were found to be at higher risk for risky online posting in the form of self-exposure or posting about drugs and alcohol in order to conform with social cues and norms.

"A Cross-Cultural Study of Risky Online Self-Presentation" (White et al.) suggests that young adults underestimate the risk associated with posting personal and sensitive information on social networking sites. The study of British and Italian undergraduate students shows that interaction with social networking sites is primarily motivated by impulsiveness or a deliberate attempt to present oneself in a certain way. Both of these mechanisms were also shown to increase the likelihood of posting personal information, offensive content, and/or posts about drugs/alcohol, which were all considered as risky online behavior.  In addition to loss of privacy, young adults on social networking sites today are increasingly at risk for professional consequences as more and more companies are reviewing the profiles of their potential employees.The researchers suggest that it is possible that this phenomenon occurs across cultures because in the separate countries the same motivational processes were observed.

The study surveyed candidates to measure levels of risk exposure, impulsiveness, and self-monitoring. Both impulsiveness and self-monitoring were positive predictors for increased engagement and greater risk exposure. Self-monitoring is to adapt your self presentation to societal cues and norms. So, whether an individuals persona on a social networking site is impulsive and true to self, or an artificially constructed one, continued engagement was correlated with posting objectionable content and/or personal information. It was also revealed that young adults often don't focus enough on being employable while online and many in the study came to regret online disclosures.

Limitations of the study include that the small cohorts of undergraduates surveyed don't necessarily reflect all cultural attitudes in that country. One peculiar finding in the experiment found that cyber culture had a bigger effect on risk taking online than nationality. Using social media profiles to evaluate candidates is a method increasingly used by British and North American companies today, a potentially scary prospect for young adults underestimating the risk associated with continual engagement on social networking sights.

Daily app usage yields reduced symptoms of sub-threshold post traumatic stress disorder

Story highlights:

  • 10 to 20 percent of U.S. military service members have PTSD since returning from Afghanistan and Iraq
  • Apps were selected to encourage social engagement and provide psychoeducation which have shown to reduce the likelihood of mental health disorders
  • Both the resilience enhancement group and the control group displayed similar improvements in avoidance and hyperarousal symptom severity 

Today, the app store holds over 2 million apps. One can find apps for anything one might need - fitness training, communication, to-do lists, habit trackers - and now there are even apps with the ability to reduce the severity of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common in military service members and anyone else who has experienced a shocking, scary, or dangerous event. Sub-threshold PTSD is defined by insufficient symptoms to be fully diagnosed as PTSD as well as having a 25% progression rate to the full disorder. 

The use of smartphones has shown to increase happiness and well-being in people suffering from major depression and have improved drinking patterns in alcohol use disorders. Since 2011, the National Center for Telehealth and Technology and the Department of Veterans Affairs have developed various apps intended to reduce stress, provide psychoeducation, and promote engagement in social activities. This study hypothesized that 6 weeks of daily app usage reminders would reduce sub-threshold PTSD symptom severity compared to app usage without daily direction. 

Two groups were monitored: one with a 60-minute introductory meeting about coping methods, psychoeducation, and relaxation methods as well as receiving daily text messages about using various apps, and a second group which received only a 30-minute introductory meeting about available sources to use if symptoms worsen and daily text messages of positive aphorisms. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 were completed online on day 1, 6 weeks and on 3-, 6-, 12-month follow ups. Participants were also questioned during the 6-week period regarding app usage. 

The results showed that both groups demonstrated significant symptom reduction over time. Those receiving direct daily text messages exhibited greater app use but it did not translate into higher symptom reduction. Even with or without instruction, app usage proved beneficial in lowering symptom severity of sub-threshold PTSD which in return can also lower the progression rate to the full disorder. If smartphones have shown to decrease symptoms of such a disorder, who knows what else our devices are capable of. With over 2 million apps in the app store, there might be other apps which could be used to treat different disorders.

Are You Dating Who You Really Prefer To Date?

It makes sense to think that who you choose to date is the type of person that you would prefer to date as well, yet recent studies might be saying otherwise.

In "Preference Versus Choice in Online Dating," Stephen Whyte and Benno Torgler conducted a research study of 41,000 Australians between the ages of 18-80 who used an online dating website called RSVP.  Whyte and Torgler analyzed the factors that influence matches of online dating participants. With this study, they were basically comparing the stated preferences people choose in their partner to the characteristics of the people who they actually contacted in online dating.

According to this study, online dating has become more popular because of the increases in technology use. It has also changed the way that people have begun dating initiatives. The researchers found out that "factor's such as a person's age, their height, and their personality are all positively correlated with the number of factors in a chosen potential partner...until they reach their late 60's." The study also proved that "younger online daters match fewer characteristics when contacting a potential mate." Online daters who are older in age tend to find people who match their preferences more, which was fascinating to the researchers.

The research was designed to "explore the psychology of human interaction and decision-making."
Although the study was focused on online dating, it was being used to examine a larger picture which in this case is human behavior. Whereas dating used to be limited to work, school, or other social gatherings local to you, the options are now unlimited with online dating, which has changed some people's approach.

Whyte explains how the internet has opened up another opportunity for dating, which has potentially changed the common mindset of the act itself. He goes on to explain how findings are showing that more people would prefer to skip out on the 'Mr or Mrs Perfect' and settle with someone who has just acceptable or tolerable qualities.

You never know, maybe you'll find your companion or "acceptable" match online.

Whyte, Stephen, and Benno Torgler. “Preference Versus Choice in Online Dating.”Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking, vol. 20, no. 3, 2017, pp. 150–156.




Exploring Alcohol-Related Posts on Young Adults' Social Media

Story Highlights:
  • Young adults' social media pages can focus up to 96% of the time on alcohol.
  • The four most common themes of alcohol-related posts are "alcohol in the background", "alcohol focused", "drunken" and "drinking game".
  • A majority of social media users reported placing an alcohol post resembling "alcohol in the background" and "alcohol focus", while also reporting that posting "drunken" and "drinking game" themed posts was more unacceptable.
Young people are frequently and excessively posting alcohol-related content over social media. Unfortunately, the choice to post alcohol is harmful to future selves in job interviews, college admissions and other adult roles. The motivation and reasoning behind these posts are unclear but researchers have started to ask: what type of alcohol posts are placed on social media sites, the motivations to place alcohol posts, and which demographic is most likely to place alcohol posts?

Several studies have shown that between 36 and 96 percent of young adults' individual social media pages can feature alcohol content. For example, in their study on alcohol and social media, Beullens and Schepers observed that 96 percent of college students placed risky posts. Furthermore, most of these posts promoted alcohol in a positive way, studies suggest. Most posts are risk-related, promote alcohol positively, and remark on dangerous adventures and stories related to over-intoxication. Besides studying the content of alcohol-related posts, it is also important to understand the motivations.

A large cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the reasoning behind the many different types of alcohol posts and the potential differences between subgroups (i.e., age, gender and religion). There were 724 participants ranging between the ages of 12 and 30 years old. Using Facebook and Instagram posts, participants were assessed on four alcohol-related but differently themed posts. These themes were "alcohol in the background", "alcohol focused", "drunken", and "drinking game". Participants were asked separately for each example whether they had posted such a post in the past and the frequency of posts.

A large majority of respondents reported posting pictures resembling "alcohol in the background" in the past. Placement of "alcohol focus" posts were reported by many young people, but to a lesser extent than the first theme. It became apparent that the last two themes ("drunken" and "drinking game") were unacceptable to post but the first two are more widely accepted over the web. This study explored and outlined the common posts on social media and found that up to 58 percent of participants post "moderate" posts whereas only 9 percent would post drunken or drinking game pictures.